Monthly Archives: February 2014

Deadline to Apply to ACE Is Tomorrow!

Calling all artists! Still need to apply for the 30th annual American Craft Exposition?

The regular application deadline is tomorrow, February 28. There will be an additional $25 late application fee for applications submitted from March 1 through March 14, 2014.

ACE will be held at the Henry Crown Sports Pavilion on Northwestern University’s campus in Evanston, Illinois. The jury will accept approximately 150 craft artists.

Click here to apply for this year’s ACE: http://www.juriedartservices.com/index.php?content=event_info&event_id=754

Don’t forget that proceeds from ACE support ovarian cancer research at NorthShore University HealthSystem (NorthShore). Ovarian cancer is often dubbed a silent killer because it’s diagnosed at a late stage. At NorthShore, Gustavo Rodriguez, MD, and his research team are taking findings from the laboratory and implementing them to use today to help save lives. The Auxiliary and the entire American Craft Exposition committee are proud to play a real role in the battle against ovarian cancer by supporting this essential research.

Good luck and hope to see you in a booth this year!

Advertisements

The American Craft Exposition Kicks-Off Its 30th Season!

The Auxiliary of NorthShore University HealthSystem (NorthShore) proudly began its celebration of the American Craft Exposition’s (ACE) 30th year! On January 29, 2014 ACE Co-Chairs Susan White and Debbie Hulick, along with over 45 committee members, came to hear special guests Gustavo Rodriguez, MD, of NorthShore and long-time ACE artist Jonathan Rutledge speak.

Funds raised at this year’s ACE will continue supporting pioneering ovarian cancer research at NorthShore, just as it has done for the past 11 years. Dr. Rodriguez and his research team have uncovered a major biological mechanism underlying the ovarian cancer preventive effects of oral contraceptive pills. Dr. Rodriguez shared with the committee members how this critical research is already showing promising results in preventing ovarian cancer in at-risk women.

Dr. Gustavo Rodriguez and his research team have uncovered ovarian cancer preventive effects of oral contraceptive pills.

Dr. Gustavo Rodriguez and his research team have uncovered ovarian cancer preventive effects of oral contraceptive pills.

Committee members also heard from jewelry artist Jonathan Rutledge, who first exhibited at ACE 10 years ago as an emerging artist. Rutledge shared how he uniquely combines the granulation technique, one of the oldest techniques in jewelry making dating back to the Sumerians, with modern style to create jewelry unparalleled in quality and flair. Rutledge attributes a great deal of his success in his career as an artist to being an emerging artist at ACE when the category was first established in 2004.

Jewelry artist Jonathan Rutledge attributes a great deal of his career success to being an emerging artist at ACE.

Jewelry artist Jonathan Rutledge attributes a great deal of his career success to being an emerging artist at ACE.

“It is such a privilege to have both Dr. Rodriguez and Jonathan Rutledge to help kick-off our 2014 season,” said Co-Chair Debbie Hulick. “For 30 years ACE has been a show unmatched in caliber and significance for so many. We are looking forward to presenting another extraordinary show this year.”

2014 ACE Co-Chairs Susan White and Debbie Hulick

2014 ACE Co-Chairs Susan White and Debbie Hulick

Interview with Artist Jonathan Rutledge

Question: How many times have you exhibited at the American Craft Exposition (ACE) and how has showing at ACE impacted your career?

Answer: I’ve shown at ACE nine times and I actually got my start there as an emerging artist in 2004, which gave me the confidence to know that I can do art as a full-time career. At the time that I first showed at ACE, I was a full-time firefighter and paramedic so entering in as an emerging artist allowed me to get both feet wet and responses from the audience was phenomenal. I have a lot of thanks to ACE to helping me start my career as an artist.

Question: What have been some of your favorite parts about showing at ACE?

Answer: I’ve come to know so many people so it’s nice to see them and gratifying to come up with new work and still be accepted. It’s also fun to see what audiences like about new pieces. I find it wonderful to go back and see everyone and in that sense, ACE is like a family.

ACE 2014 co-chairs Debbie Hulick (left) and Susan J. White with artist Jonathan Rutledge

ACE 2014 co-chairs Debbie Hulick (left) and Susan J. White with artist Jonathan Rutledge

Question: Your first experience with metal occurred when you were stationed in Germany repairing F-16 jets at Ramstein Air Force Base. Shortly after you were discharged from the United States Air Force you enrolled in your first metalsmithing class. What are some of the differences and similarities between patching and painting massive jets and creating small brooches, earrings and necklaces?

Answer: The main differences between working with jets and jewelry are the size and the amount of creativity involved. When working on jets, one has to stick to the operating procedure whereas working with jewelry is creating everything, including new styles, and each piece has its own quirks to work through.

 Jonathan_Rutledge3-ACE2012

Question: Granulation is a technique where a surface is covered in granules of precious metal. This technique is also a 4,500 year-old process. Can you explain how your jewelry keeps the classical style of the technique but uses a contemporary flair? Does the deep history of this technique affect how you apply the granulation process to your work?

Answer: The granulation technique is on the classical side but the overall design of the pieces is contemporary. I really enjoy using this technique and have a deep love for history, which works its way into the design.

Jonathan_Rutledge5-ACE2012

Question: What is your design process? Do you have a specific notion of the granulation pattern in mind before designing, or is that one of the last steps you tackle in a piece?

Answer: I design by following my heart. I have an idea that comes from within and I just execute it. To initially design something, I first figure out the overall picture of what I want to make and figure out how to make it. So I start with the end in mind and work from there. With this process, each piece is unique because I can’t do it the same way each time.

Jonathan_Rutledge1-ACE2012